Dental Diagnostic Centre

World Class dental care at your neighbourhood

  • Aestheic faqs
  • Implants faqs
  • Orthodontics faqs
  • Prosthodontics faqs
  • Endodontics faqs
  • Periodontics faqs
  • Glossary

FAQs - Aesthetics


Dental Crowns


  • What Problems Could Develop With a Dental Crown?
  • How Long Do Dental Crowns Last?
  • TDoes a Crowned Tooth Require any Special Care?
  • How Much Do Crowns Cost?

What Problems Could Develop With a Dental Crown?


Discomfort or sensitivity. Your newly crowned tooth may be sensitive immediately after the procedure as the anesthesia begins to wear off. If the tooth that has been crowned still has a nerve in it, you may experience some heat and cold sensitivity. Your dentist may recommend that you brush your teeth with toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth.

Chipped crown . Crowns made of all porcelain can sometimes chip. If the chip is small, a composite resin can be used to repair the chip with the crown remaining in your mouth. If the chipping is extensive, the crown may need to be replaced.

Loose crown . Sometimes the cement washes out from under the crown. Not only does this allow the crown to become loose, it allows bacteria to leak in and cause decay to the tooth that remains. If your crown feels loose, contact our office or email us .

Crown falls off . If this happens, contact our office or email us immediately. Our dentists and staff can then give you specific instructions on how to care for your tooth and crown for the day or so until you can be seen for an evaluation. Your dentist may be able to re-cement your crown in place; if not, a new crown is required.

Allergic reaction . Because the metals used to make crowns are usually a mixture of metals, an allergic reaction to the metals or porcelain used in crowns can occur, but this is extremely rare. Please do kindly inform our staff on any allgeric reactions you may have before any medical or dental treatment.

How Long Do Dental Crowns Last?


The life span of a crown depends on the amount of "wear and tear" the crown is exposed to, how well you follow good oral hygiene practices, and your personal mouth-related habits. Habits such as grinding or clenching your teeth, chewing ice, biting your fingernails and using your teeth to open packaging puts on greater wear and tear to the crown. On average in general, dental crowns last between 5 and 15 years.

Does a Crowned Tooth Require any Special Care?


While a crowned tooth does not require any special care, remember that simply because a tooth is crowned does not mean the underlying tooth is protected from decay or gum disease. Therefore, continue to follow good oral hygiene practices, including brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing once a day-especially around the crown area where the gum meets the tooth.

How Much Do Crowns Cost?


The costs at our dental clinic varies depending the type of crown material selected. For example, for porcelain-fused-to-metal alloy crowns, the higher the percentage of precious metal alloy in the crowns, they more costly they tend to be.

Dental Bridge


  • Will It Be Difficult to Eat With a Dental Bridge?
  • Will the Dental Bridge Change How I Speak?
  • How Long Do Dental Bridges Last?
  • How Much Do Dental Bridges Cost?
  • How Do I Care for My Bridges?

Will It Be Difficult to Eat With a Dental Bridge ?


Replacing missing teeth should actually make eating easier. Until you become accustomed to the bridge, eat soft foods that have been cut into small pieces.

Will the Dental Bridge Change How I Speak?


It can be difficult to speak clearly when teeth are missing in the front or anterior areas. Wearing a dental bridge with the anterior teeth in their proper relationship will help you speak properly.

How Long Do Dental Bridges Last?


The life span of a crown is depend on the amount of "wear and tear" the bridge is exposed to, how well you follow good oral hygiene practices, and your personal mouth-related habits. Dental bridges can last 5 to 7 years and even longer. With good oral hygiene and regular prophylaxis, it is not unusual for the life span of a fixed bridge to be over 10 years.

How Much Do Dental Bridges Cost?


The cost of dental bridges varies depending on the type of bridge selected.

How Do I Care for My Bridges?


It is important to keep your remaining teeth healthy and strong as the success of the bridge (depending on the type selected) depends on the solid foundation offered by the surrounding teeth. Brushing twice a day and flossing daily helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease that can lead to tooth loss. Your dentist or dental hygienist can demonstrate how to properly brush and floss your teeth. Keeping a regular cleaning schedule will help diagnose problems at an early stage when treatment has a better prognosis. Selecting a balanced diet for proper nutrition is also important

Dental Bonding


  • What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Dental Bonding?
  • Do Bonded Teeth Require Special Care?
  • How Long Does Bonding Material Last?

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Dental Bonding?


Advantages:Bonding is among the easiest and least expensive of cosmetic dental procedures. Unlike veneers and crowns, which are customized tooth coverings that must be manufactured in a laboratory, bonding usually can be done in one office visit unless several teeth are involved. Anotheradvantage, compared with veneers and crowns, is that the least amount of tooth enamel is removed. Also, unless dental bonding is being performed to fill a cavity, anesthesia is usually not required.

Disadvantages : Although the material used in dental bonding is somewhat stain resistant, it does not resist stains as well as veneers and crowns. Another disadvantage is that the bonding materials do not last as long nor are as strong as other restorative procedures, such as crowns, veneers, or fillings. Additionally, bonding materials can chip and break off the tooth.

Because of some of the limitations of bonding, some dentists view bonding as best suited for small cosmetic changes, for temporary correction of cosmetic defects, and for correction of teeth in areas of very low bite pressure usually at the front teeth. Consult with your dentist about the best cosmetic approach for your particular problem.

Do Bonded Teeth Require Special Care?


No. Simply follow good oral hygiene practices. Brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss at least once a day and see your dentist for regular professional check-ups and cleanings.

Because bonding material can chip, it is important to avoid such habits as biting fingernails;chewing on pens, ice or other hard food objects; or using your bonded teeth as an opener. If you do notice any sharp edges on a bonded tooth or if your tooth feels odd when you bite down, call your dentist.

How Long Does Bonding Material Last?


The lifespan of bonding materials depends on how much bonding was done and your oral habits. Typically, however, bonding material lasts from 3 years up to about 10 years before needing to be touched up or replaced.

Implants faqs

How Successful Are Dental Implants?


Success rates vary, depending on where in the jaw the implants are placed but, in general, dental implants have a success rate of up to 97%. With proper care (see below), implants can last a lifetime.

Is there discomfort involved?

Just as with any surgery, there can be some slightly discomfort. However, anesthetic and pain-controlled medications are used to eliminate any discomfort at the time of the procedure. Approximately 95 percent of patients report discomfort of 0-2 on a scale of 0-10 the day after the implants are placed. The doctor will prescribe medications to ease any discomfort that may occur. Special care will be taken to stay in contact with you after the surgery to be sure that you remain comfortable.

How long does it the treatment take?


To complete treatment takes an average of 6 to 8 weeks or shorter. Nowadays, in some cases, a temporary crown can placed on immediately so called " Immediated loaded implants " or " One day implants ". We do, however, provide patients with temporary teeth if it is the anterior tooth in all cases. AT NO TIME are you without teeth unless you elect to do so.

How long can I expect to be off work?


Generally, we recommend the day of and the following day after surgery, that no strenuous exercise be done. Generally, taking time off work is not necessary for a single tooth replacement case because the procedure is not more complex than a tooth extraction. However, the amount of time off required is an individual decision.

Is there a chance of rejection?


The body does not reject a dental implant, as it might a soft tissue transplant, such as a lung, heart or kidney. This does not mean that an implant cannot fail, but it would be due to other factors, such as improper force on the implant or other conditions or existing diseases of the patient or poor oral hygiene. Dental implants are made of a material, titanium, that is totally compatible with body tissues and actually integrates with the surrounding bone and becomes part of the body.

Who is a candidate for implants?


Anyone who is missing one or more (even all) of their teeth may be a candidate for implants.

If one or a few of the teeth are missing, implants in conjunction with a crown or bridge can replace those teeth and function as normal teeth without losing more bone and being subject to decay.

If all or most of your teeth are missing, then implants may be placed to anchor a loose denture. Sometimes, if there is already some bone loss, bone can be added and regenerated or a technique called bone expansion can be used to create a more ideal site for the implant(s). Ultimately, a consultation with a dentist who is knowledgable on these procedures can help determine your individual needs.

What can happen with missing teeth without treatment?


When you lose your teeth, you gradually lose the bone that supported them. As this bone disappears, problems with other teeth nearby and a lack of support for dentures, partials and bridges increase. These could include pain, mobility, lack of retention for prosthetics, sharp, painful ridges, mobile gum tissue and sore spots.

The tongue enlarges to accommodate spaces of missing teeth. With tooth loss, a five-fold decrease in function occurs and the diet shifts to softer foods. Also, when bone is lost, numbness to the lower lip or even the possibility of fracture of the jaw rises.

Since the bone is deteriorating, it will spread and deteriorate around healthy teeth and ultimately cause the loss of those teeth similar to a domino effect.

This progression affects the ability to provide the same treatment in the later stages of bone loss than if treatment had been started earlier in the process. It's much better to replace a tooth BEFORE these side effects occur. A patient risks the possibility of not being able to provide the same, simple type of treatment that would have been possible earlier if treatment is delayed.

Orthodontics faqs


At what age can people have orthodontic treatment?


Children and adults can both benefit from orthodontics, because healthy teeth can be moved at almost any age. Because monitoring growth and development is crucial to managing some orthodontic problems well, it is recommended that children have an orthodontic screening before the age of 7. Some orthodontic problems may be easier to correct if treated early. Waiting until all the permanent teeth have come in, or until facial growth is nearly complete, may make correction of some problems more difficult.

An orthodontic evaluation at any age is advisable if a parent, family dentist or the patient's physician has noted a problem.

What causes orthodontic problems (malocclusions)


Most malocclusions are inherited, but some are acquired. Inherited problems include crowding of teeth, too much space between teeth, extra or missing teeth, and a wide variety of other irregularities of the jaws, teeth and face.

Acquired malocclusions can be caused by trauma (accidents), thumb, finger or dummy (pacifier) sucking, airway obstruction by tonsils and adenoids, dental disease or premature loss of primary (baby) or permanent teeth. Whether inherited or acquired, many of these problems affect not only alignment of the teeth but also facial development and appearance as well.

How long will orthodontic treatment take?


In general, active treatment time with orthodontic appliances (braces) ranges from one to three years. Interceptive, or early treatment procedures, may take only a few months. The actual time depends on the growth of the patient's mouth and face, the cooperation of the patient and the severity of the problem. Mild problems usually require less time, and some individuals respond faster to treatment than others. Use of rubber bands and/or headgear, if prescribed by the orthodontist, contributes to completing treatment as scheduled.

While orthodontic treatment requires a time commitment, patients are rewarded with healthy teeth, proper jaw alignment and a beautiful smile that lasts a lifetime. Teeth and jaws in proper alignment look better, work better, contribute to general physical health and can improve self-confidence.

Why does orthodontic treatment time sometimes last longer than anticipated?


Estimates of treatment time can only be that - estimates. Patients grow at different rates and will respond in their own ways to orthodontic treatment. The orthodontist has specific treatment goals in mind, and will usually continue treatment until these goals are achieved. Patient cooperation, however, is the single best predictor of staying on time with treatment. Patients who cooperate by wearing rubber bands, headgear or other needed appliances as directed, while taking care not to damage appliances, will most often lead to on-time and excellent treatment results.

How do braces work?


In their entirety, braces work by applying continuous pressure over a period of time to slowly move teeth in a specific direction. As the teeth move, the bony tooth socket reabsorbs and changes shape as pressure is applied.

Braces are made up of the following components:


Brackets are the small squares that are bonded directly to each tooth with a special dental bonding agent or are attached to orthodontic bands. Brackets act like handles, holding the arch wires that move the teeth.

Orthodontic bands are stainless steel, clear or tooth-colored materials that are cemented with dental bonding agents or cement to teeth. They wrap around each tooth to provide an anchor for the brackets. The clear or tooth-colored bands are more cosmetically appealing options but are more expensive than stainless steel. They are not used in all patients. Some people have only brackets and no bands.

Spacers are separators that fit between teeth to create a small space prior to placement of orthodontic bands. Arch wires attach to the brackets and act as tracks to guide the movement of the teeth. Arch wires can be made of metal or be clear or tooth-colored.

Ties are small rubber rings or fine wires that fasten the arch wire to the brackets. They can be clear, metal or colored. A buccal tube on the band of the last molar holds the end of the arch wire securely in place.

Tiny elastic rubber bands , called ligatures, hold the arch wires to the brackets.

Springs may be placed on the arch wires between brackets to push, pull, open or close the spaces between teeth.

Two bands on the upper teeth may have headgear tubes on them to hold the facebow of the headgear in place.

Elastics or rubber bands attach to hooks on brackets and are worn between the upper and lower teeth in various ways. They apply pressure to move the upper teeth against the lower teeth to achieve a perfect fit of individual teeth.

Face bow headgear is the wire gadget that is used to move the upper molars back in the mouth to correct bite discrepancies and also to create room for crowded anterior teeth. The face bow consists of an inner metal part shaped like a horseshoe that goes in the mouth, attaching to buccal tubes, and an outer part that goes around the outside of the face and is connected to a headgear strap.

How Often Will I Need to See the Orthodontist During Treatment?


Your orthodontist will want to see you about every month to 6 weeks or so in order to make sure that the braces are exerting steady pressure on your teeth. To create more tension and pressure on your teeth, your orthodontist will make adjustments in the wires, springs, or rubber bands of your braces. In some cases, braces alone aren't enough to straighten the teeth or shift the jaw. In these situations, an external appliance, such as a headgear may need to be worn at home in the evening or through the night.

Will Braces Cause Pain?


Pulling baby teeth may be necessary to allow severely crowded permanent teeth to come in at a normal time in a reasonably normal location. If the teeth are severely crowded, it may be clear that some uninterrupted permanent teeth (usually the canine teeth) will either remain impacted (teeth that should have come in, but have not), or come in to a highly undesirable position. To allow severely crowded teeth to move on their own into much more desirable positions, sequential removal of baby teeth and permanent teeth (usually first premolars) can dramatically improve a severe crowding problem. This sequential extraction of teeth, called serial extraction, is typically followed by comprehensive orthodontic treatment after tooth eruption has improved as much as it can on its own.

After all the permanent teeth have come in, the pulling of permanent teeth may be necessary to correct crowding or to make space for necessary tooth movement to correct a bite problem. Proper extraction of teeth during orthodontic treatment should leave the patient with both excellent functionand a pleasing look.

What Care Can I Expect After the Braces Come Off?


After your braces are taken off, your teeth will be thoroughly cleaned. Your orthodontist may want to take another set of x-rays and bite impressions to check how well the braces straightened your teeth and to see if any wisdom teeth have developed. If wisdom teeth are beginning to come in after your braces have been removed, your orthodontist may recommend the wisdom teeth be pulled to prevent your newly straightened teeth from shifting position in your mouth.

Your orthodontist will also fit you with a retainer. A retainer is a custom-made, removable appliance that help teeth to maintain their new position after braces have been removed. Retainers can also be used to treat minor orthodontic problems. The use of a retainer is a very important part of post-braces care. Retainers, which are typically made of rubber or clear plastic and metal wires that cover the outside surface of the teeth, need to be worn all the time for the first 6 months and then usually only during sleep. The time frame for wearing a retainer will vary from patient to patient. The reason why a retainer is needed is that even though braces may have successfully straightened your teeth, they are not completely settled in their new position until the bones, gums, and muscles adapt to the change. Also, after long periods of time, teeth tend to shift.

What kinds of orthodontic appliances are typically used to correct jaw-growth problems?


Correcting jaw-growth problems is done by the process of dentofacial orthopedics. Some of the more common orthopedic appliances used by orthodontists today that help the length of the upper and lower jaws become more compatible include:

Headgear: This appliance applies pressure to the upper teeth and upper jaw to guide the rate and direction of upper jaw growth and upper tooth eruption. The headgear may be removed by the patient and is usually worn 10 to 12 hours per day.

Herbst: The Herbst appliance is usually fixed to the upper and lower molar teeth and may not be removed by the patient. By holding the lower jaw forward and influencing jaw growth and tooth positions, the Herbst appliance can help correct severe protrusion of the upper teeth.

Bionator: This removable appliance holds the lower jaw forward and guides eruption of the teeth into a more desirable bite while helping the upper and lower jaws to grow in proportion with each other. Patient compliance in wearing this appliance is essential for successful improvement.

Palatal Expansion Appliance: A child's upper jaw may also be too narrow for the upper teeth to fit properly with the lower teeth (a crossbite). When this occurs, a palatal expansion appliance can be fixed to the upper back teeth. This appliance can markedly expand the width of the upper jaw.

The decision about when and which of these or other appliances to use for orthopedic correction is based on each individual patient's problem. Usually one of several appliances can be used effectively to treat a given problem. Patient cooperation and the experience of the treating orthodontist are critical elements in success of dentofacial orthopedic treatment.

Prosthodontics faqs


Are There Alternatives to Dentures?


Yes, dental implants can be used to support permanently cemented bridges , eliminating the need for a denture. Implant supported overdentures may also be considered that gives better retention than conventional dentures. The cost of implants however is usually greater, but the implants and bridges more closely resemble the feel of real teeth. Dental implants are becoming the alternative to dentures but not everyone is a candidate for implants. Consult your dentist for advice.

Will Dentures Make Me Look Different?


Dentures are made to closely resemble your natural teeth so there should be no noticeable change to your appearance. In fact, dentures may even improve your smile and fill out your facial appearance.

Will Eating With New Dentures Be Difficult?


ating with new dentures will take a little practice and may be uncomfortable for some wearers for a few weeks. To get used to the new denture, start with soft foods cut into small pieces. Chew slowly using both sides of your mouth. As you get used to your new dentures, add other foods until you return to your normal diet. Be cautious with hot or hard foods and sharp-edged bones or shells. And, avoid foods that are extremely sticky or hard. You may want to avoid chewing gum while you adjust to the denture. Also, don't use toothpicks while wearing dentures.

Will Dentures Change How I Speak?


You may have difficulty pronouncing certain words. If so, practice by saying the difficult wordsout loud. With practice and with time you will become accustomed to speaking properly with your denture.

If your dentures "click" while you're talking, you should contact your dentist. Your dentures may occasionally slip when you laugh, cough, or smile. Reposition the dentures by gently biting down and swallowing. If any speaking problem persists, consult your dentist or prosthodontist.

Are Dentures Worn 24 Hours a Day?


Your dentist or prosthodontist will instruct you as to how long to wear your denture and when to remove it. During the first several days after receiving your denture, you may be asked to wear it all the time, including while you sleep. Although this may be temporarily uncomfortable, it is the quickest way to identify the areas on your denture that may need adjustment. Once adjustments are made, you should remove your dentures before going to bed. This allows gum tissues to rest and allows normal stimulation and cleansing by the tongue and saliva. The denture can be put back in your mouth in the morning

Should I Use a Denture Adhesive?


A denture adhesive may be considered under the following circumstances:

1. To enhance your satisfaction with a properly constructed denture. Adhesives enhance retention, stability, bite force and an individual's sense of security

2. To assist individuals with dry mouth conditions that lessen denture adherence, such as individuals taking cold medications, those with neurologic disabilities including strokes, and the elderly

3. To provide added stability and security for those who place unusual demands on their facial muscles, such as public speakers or musicians

When Shouldn't Adhesives Be Considered?


  • When used as a "fix" for ill-fitting or poorly constructed dentures. If your dentures begin to feel loose, cause discomfort or cause sores to develop, contact your dentist.
  • When a dentist has not evaluated your dentures for a long time. Dentures rest on gum tissue and your jawbone, which shrink and deteriorate, respectively, over time. Therefore, the real problem might be a need for a denture adjustment or new dentures.
  • When oral hygiene practices cannot be sustained.
  • When adhesives have been used for a long time, especially when visits to the dentist are infrequent, and when the frequency and volume of the adhesive use increases. These developments may indicate the need for a denture adjustment or new dentures.
  • When oral hygiene practices cannot be sustained.

How Are Denture Adhesives Applied?

Here are some tips to consider when applying denture adhesives:


  • Use the minimum amount necessary to provide the maximum benefit. Apply less than you think you need, and then gradually increase the amount until you feel comfortable.
  • WDistribute the adhesive evenly on the tissue bearing surface of the denture
  • When oral hygiene practices cannot be sustained.
  • Apply or reapply when necessary to provide the desired effect
  • Always apply the adhesive to a thoroughly clean denture
  • Remember adhesives work best with a well-fitting denture

What Are the Types of Adhesives?


Paste application . Apply to a dry or preferably wet denture. Avoid placing adhesive close to the denture borders. If the adhesive oozes, use less of the product. For dentures on the upper jaw, apply three short strips of adhesive-or s series of small dots-along the ridge area and one down the center. For dentures on the lower jaw, apply three short strips of adhesive-or s series of small dots-in the center of the ridge area.

Powder application . Sprinkle a thin, uniform layer throughout the tissue-bearing surface of the denture. Shake off excess powder and press the denture into place. Powders may be preferred over pastes because they are easier to clean off the denture and tissue. In addition, they don't have the same tendency as pastes do to "shim" (keep the denture away from the tissue).

Are Denture Adhesives Safe?


Dental adhesives are safe as long as they are used as they were meant to be used. If the denture is well-fitting and the adhesive is only used to give added stability, there should be no ill effects. If adhesives are used excessively to fill voids for an ill-fitting denture, they can be harmful to the underlying soft and hard tissues. Occasionally, in these cases, inflammation of the soft tissues can result. In addition, because of its movement on the soft tissue and underlying bone, an ill-fitting denture can cause bone loss.

Endodontics faqs


Why Does the Pulp Need to Be Removed?


When nerve tissue or pulp is damaged, it breaks down and bacteria begin to multiply within the pulp chamber. The bacteria and other decayed debris can cause an infection or abscessed tooth. An abscess is a pus-filled pocket that forms at the end of the roots of the tooth. An abscess occurs when the infection spreads all the way past the ends of the roots of the tooth. In addition to an abscess, an infection in the root canal of a tooth can cause:

  • Swelling that may spread to other areas of the face, neck, or head
  • Bone loss around the tip of the root
  • Drainage problems extending outward from the root. A hole can occur through the side of the tooth
  • with drainage into the gums or through the cheek with drainage into the skin

What Damages a Tooth's Nerve and Pulp in the First Place?


Nerve and pulp can become irritated, inflamed and infected due to deep decay, large fillings, a crack or chip in the tooth, or trauma to the face.

What Are the Signs that a Root Canal Is Needed?


  • Sometimes no symptoms are present. However, signs to look for include:
  • Severe toothache pain upon chewing or application of pressure
  • Prolonged sensitivity/pain to heat or cold temperatures (after the hot or cold object has been removed)
  • Discoloration (a darkening) of the tooth
  • Swelling and tenderness in the nearby gums
  • A persistent or recurring pimple on the gums

Are there any complications of a Root Canal?


Despite your dentist's best efforts to clean and seal a tooth, new infections might emerge. Among the likely reasons for this include:

  • More than the normally anticipated number of root canals in a tooth (leaving one of them uncleaned) An undetected crack in the root of a tooth
  • Inadequate dental restoration
  • A breakdown of the inner sealing material over time, allowing bacteria to recontaminate the inner aspects of the tooth

Sometimes retreatment can be successful, other times endodontic surgery must be tried in order to save the tooth. The most common endodontic surgical procedure is an apicoectomy or root-end resection. This procedure relieves the inflammation or infection in the bony area around the end of your tooth that continues after endodontic treatment. In this procedure, the gum tissue is opened, the infected tissue is removed, and sometimes the very end of the root is removed. A small filling may be placed to seal the root canal.

Are there any alternatives to a Root Canal?


Saving your natural teeth is the very best option, if possible. Your natural teeth allow you t eat a wide variety of foods necessary to maintain proper nutrition. The root canal procedure is the treatment of choice.

The only alternative to a root canal procedure is having the tooth extracted and replaced with a bridge , implant , or removable partial denture to restore chewing function and prevent adjacent teeth from shifting.

Periodontics


What is Periodontics? What is the treatment procedure?

Periodontics deals with treatment of diseases of gum, surrounding teeth. The condition is treated by scaling, deep curettage, flap surgery, alveolar bone reconstruction surgery, bone grafting etc. What is Endodontics? Endodontics deals with treatments like crowning/capping, inlays, outlays, root canal treatments and restorations

What is plaque?


Plaque is a sticky material formed by mucus, saliva, food particles and bacteria which sticks on the surface of teeth.

What is tartar?


Tartar is mineralized plaque. This is the yellowish-brown, hard substance that forms when calcium from the saliva attaches to the teeth. It cannot be removed by a toothbrush or floss and normally requires the expertise of a dentist for removal.

My teeth is discolored. Can it be made to look white? What are the procedures?


Definitely. The teeth can be made to look white by cleaning/polishing and by bleaching. In certain cases, teeth capping, composite material treatment or ceramic veneer are applied. Isn't tooth extraction very painful? Tooth extraction is a minor surgical procedure. Your dentist will apply local anesthesia causing numbness in mouth and also use antibiotics. Hence, you will not feel any pain. After the extraction, there could be some discomfort which is natural.

What all dental problems can cause bad breath?


Deposition of plaque/calculus on teeth, Gum Swelling, Periodontal Problems, Tooth Abscess and Cavities in Tooth can cause bad breath. Off course, other than dental problems, bad breath can be caused by throat / ear infection, sinusitis and gastric problems.

What is Scaling?


Scaling is the procedure of removing calculus/tartar deposition on teeth. Can food be taken immediately after Dental Treatment? No. Its better to leave an hour before the first intake.

Glossary


A


Abutment: A tooth or teeth used to support and anchor a fixed bridge or removable denture prosthesis.

Alveolar Process (ridge): The projection of bone that surrounds the roots of the teeth. The ridge is the remainder of the process after extractions.

Amalgam (silver filling): A metal alloy consisting of silver, tin, zinc and copper combined with mercury and used as a restorative material in operative dentistry.

Analgesia: Administration of a drug resulting in loss of pain sensation without the loss of consciousness.

Anterior teeth: The front teeth. They include the six upper front teeth and six lower front teeth.

B


Bitewing x-ray: A specific type of x-ray that shows, simultaneously, the crowns of upper and lower posterior teeth and a portion of their roots and supporting structures. Generally used to diagnose the presence of dental decay in adjoining tooth surfaces.

Bridge: A replacement for one or more missing or extracted natural teeth, supported and held by attachments to restored teeth, and usually not removable. (Sometimes referred to as a fixed denture.) The cost of bridgework is usually calculated in units consisting of each crowned abutment tooth and each artificial tooth replacing a missing natural tooth (called a pontic).

C


Cap: A layman's term for "jacket" (see "jacket" below). Caries: Decay in teeth. Cavities: Destruction of the tooth structure as a result of dental caries. Usually classified by the number of tooth surfaces affected. Cosmetic dentistry : Any dental service performed primarily to improve appearance. Crown:A fixed restoration covering the major part of the natural tooth, usually fabricated of gold, porcelain, or acrylic resin.

D


Deciduous: The first teeth, ("baby teeth"). See "Primary Teeth" below.

Dental Arch: The curved structure of the teeth or alveolar ridge. A horseshoe-like arrangement of the maxilla and mandible (upper and lower jaw).

Dentition: Natural teeth in the dental arch. Natural teeth may be primary or secondary teeth.

Denture:An artificial substitute for missing natural teeth and adjacent structures.

Complete Denture: A dental prosthesis which replaces the lost natural teeth and associated structures of the entire upper or lower jaw.

Partial Denture: An artificial replacement of one or more but less than all of the natural teeth and associated structures. Usually removable.

E


Endodontics: The branch of dentistry concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the pulp chamber and pulp canals.